Saturday, December 7, 2013

Catch of the Day: The Name of a Sheep


CATCH OF THE DAY: Hats off to the Orphan Black writers yet again because Rachel Duncan is literally the name of a sheep. Don't believe us? Click through for more!

Plus, you know you want to see that Helena gif. (You know the one. The sheep one). 
Oh, Rachel Duncan, you mysterious lady.

As if the Orphan Black writers didn't already have us hanging on your every word, you just had to go and have a name that practically begs to be analyzed.

Hebrew in origin, the name Rachel literally means a female sheep, or ewe.

I'm not fooling around with you, baby. *

As you might recall, in Helena's quest to hunt down and kill the entirety of the Clone Club, she very specifically refers to the clones as "sheep."


Since Rachel is Orphan Black's ProClone, it's no wonder she is Sheep Supreme as well.

But, the hidden meanings behind Rachel's name don't end there. Dolly the Sheep was the first ever mammal to be cloned, so it's only natural (or unnatural?) for the clone raised by science to be named after her ancestor. 

Add to this the fact that the story of Rachel in the Old Testament revolves around rival sisters, shady contracts, and infertility, and we've definitely got some heavy Orphan Black parallels happening.


Ewe can't fool us, Bump N' Grind. *

-------

*For those of you not familiar with the Bump N' Grind phenomenon, when asked what music she listens to to get into character for Rachel, Tatiana Maslany's answer was 90s slow jams. Then, the Orphan Black Tumblr community got a little hiatus-delirious and decided "Bump N' Grind" was Rachel Duncan's theme song. Honestly, we can't argue.



Written by: Jacqueline 
Jacqueline is one half of the team at the helm of Red Herry, and the whole brain behind almost every fish pun you can find on this website. She is a fierce advocate for helmets, ice cream, and the Oxford Comma.
Follow Jacqueline on Twitter and Tumblr.

2 comments :

  1. Rachel in Hebrew means mother sheep, not female sheep. In fact sheep in Hebrew is the female term and there is a name for the male sheep.

    ReplyDelete
  2. There's another sheep-themed parallel with Rachel; I find it very difficult to believe that she wasn't named after Rachael Rosen from the Philip Dick novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. (You're probably familiar with it as the source material for the film Blade Runner.) Massive skyscraper? Sci-fi bob cut? Sociopath incapable of empathy? Yep, yep, and yep.

    ReplyDelete